Green Cards through Employment

Temporary Work Visas

Students and Exchange Visitors Visas

Family Green Cards

Fiancee and Spouse Visas

Consular Processing

Asylum

Citizenship

 

Fiancée and Spouse Visas

Bringing your Fiancée or Spouse to the U.S.

K-1 Fiancée Visas

Washington K1 Visa AttorneyA K-1 Visa is a nonimmigrant visa benefiting fiancés and fiancées of US citizen petitioners. It allows the fiancé(e) of an American citizen to enter the United States for a 90-day period in order to marry the American citizen and apply for a change of status to Permanent Resident.
Generally, the couple must have met in person within two years of filing the petition.  However, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) may grant an exception to this requirement in those cases where it may be contrary to the couple’s cultural traditions for a man and woman to meet before marriage.  USCIS may consider a person to be a fiancé/fiancée even after a marriage contract has been concluded in cases where the American citizen petitioner and the foreign national spouse have not met and consummated the marriage.  Additionally, the fiancé/fiancée must also meet some of the requirements for an immigrant visa.

K-2 Visas

Dependents of a K-1 Visa holder may enter the United States with a K-2 Child Visa: Children under the age of 18 of a K-1 Visa holder may obtain K-2 Visas to accompany the K-1 parent.  Upon arrival K-4 children may attend school and after the marriage of the K-1 parent to the U.S. citizen petitioner, may obtain employment authorization.

K-3 Spouse Visas, IR-1 and CR-1 Visas,

Spouses of U.S. citizens and the spouse's children can also come to the United States on nonimmigrant visas (IR-1 and CR-1 Spouse Visas, formerly called K-3 Visas) in order to complete the immigration process in the United States. The U.S. citizen must first file an immigrant visa petition on the spouse’s behalf before filing a nonimmigrant IR-1 or CR-1 Visa petition. 

K-4 Child visas

Additionally, before a K-4 Visa can be issued to a child, the parent must have a IR-1 or CR-1 Visa or be in a IR-1 or CR-1 status.

 

 

Disclaimer:
This website is designed for general information only. The information presented in this website should not be construed or relied on as legal advice or as the basis of a lawyer/client relationship.

 


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